Acerca de

unnamed.jpeg

Vascular Lab

DIAGNOSTIC TESTS

What kinds of vascular tests are most common? What happens when you have one? Will it hurt? Does it mean you need surgery? Following are the most commonly prescribed vascular tests. Be sure to ask your surgeon if you still have questions. 

IMG_7659.heic
IMG-7998.jpg

Request

an 

Appointment

For Comprehensive Person-Centered

Care

Pulse Volume Recordings (PVR)

Pulse volume recording (PVR) study. This is done to assess blood flow in your arms or legs. Blood pressure cuffs are inflated on your arm or leg, and the blood pressure there is measured using the Doppler probe. 

Ankle-Brachial Index or ABI Test

A non-invasive test that uses inflatable cuffs to gauge circulation (blood flow) and measure blood pressure in the arteries at various locations on the thigh, calf, foot and toes. Minimal, brief discomfort, similar to what you feel while having a routine blood pressure test with an inflatable arm cuff. Comparing the blood pressure in your arms to the blood pressure in your legs develops a calculation called the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The ankle-brachial index will indicate to the technician if you are at risk for developing peripheral arterial disease (PAD).

Peripheral Arterial Ultrasound

Many arteries and the veins can be studied by ultrasound, including the carotid, arm and leg arteries as well as the abdominal aorta. You may be given a carotid duplex test to determine whether plaque has accumulated in your arteries, causing Peripheral Arterial Disease.

Duplex ultrasound is a painless, noninvasive, no-risk test to evaluate blood flow through your arteries and vein . This test provides information to help your vascular surgeon make a sound diagnosis and outline a treatment plan. No radiation, dye or needles are used. Accuracy is critical, so ultrasound testing should ALWAYS be performed by a credentialed sonographer in an accredited vascular laboratory.

  • Take your normal medications on the day of your exam. Do not use powders, oils, or lotions on your legs on the day of your exam. Wearing your clothes, you will be asked to lie on a stretcher.  

  • Ultrasound gel, usually warmed for your comfort, will be placed on various parts of your body including arms and legs. Through the gel, the technician will apply a small hand-held device that emits sound waves. 

  • When the test is completed, the technician will remove excess gel. The gel is water-soluble and will not stain your skin or clothes.

 

Carotid Duplex Ultrasound

Many arteries and the veins can be studied by ultrasound, including the carotid, arm and leg arteries as well as the abdominal aorta. You may be given a carotid duplex test to determine whether plaque has accumulated in your arteries, causing carotid artery disease (hardening of the arteries).​ 

Duplex ultrasound is a painless, noninvasive, no-risk test to evaluate blood flow through your arteries and veins . This test provides information to help your vascular surgeon make a sound diagnosis and outline a treatment plan. No radiation, dye or needles are used. Accuracy is critical, so ultrasound testing should ALWAYS be performed by a credentialed sonographer in an accredited vascular laboratory.

  • Wear a shirt with an open collar. You may be asked to remove jewelry. Wearing your clothes, you will be asked to lie on a stretcher.  

  • Ultrasound gel, usually warmed for your comfort, will be placed on either side of your neck.  

  • Through the gel, the technician will apply to your neck a small hand-held device that emits sound waves. 

  • When the test is completed, the technician will remove excess gel from your neck. The gel is water-soluble and will not stain your skin or clothes.

 

 

Abdominal Aortic Ultrasound

Many arteries and the veins can be studied by ultrasound, including the carotid, arm and leg arteries as well as the abdominal aorta. You may be given an abdominal aortic ultrasound  to produce images of your aorta, the largest artery in your body.  Most aortic aneurysms produce no symptoms.  Symptoms that can be present (often once the aneurysm is quite large) are chest, back, or abdominal pain or a pulsating feeling in the upper abdomen.

Duplex ultrasound is a painless, noninvasive, no-risk test to evaluate blood flow through your arteries and veins . This test provides information to help your vascular surgeon make a sound diagnosis and outline a treatment plan. No radiation, dye or needles are used. Accuracy is critical, so ultrasound testing should ALWAYS be performed by a credentialed sonographer in an accredited vascular laboratory.

  • Do not eat or drink anything after midnight prior to your exam.  Take any morning medications with small sips of water. If you are diabetic, do not take your insulin or pills on the morning of the exam. Wear a two-piece outfit (no dresses). Wearing your clothes, you will be asked to lie on a stretcher.  

  • Ultrasound gel, usually warmed for your comfort, will be placed on your abdomen

  • Through the gel, the technician will apply to your abdomen a small hand-held device that emits sound waves. 

  • When the test is completed, the technician will remove excess gel from your abdomen. The gel is water-soluble and will not stain your skin or clothes.

Renal Ultrasound

Many arteries and the veins can be studied by ultrasound, including the carotid, arm and leg arteries as well as the abdominal aorta. You may be given a renal ultrasound  to produce images of your renal arteries. These arteries supply oxygenated blood to your kidneys. This test helps to detect blockages or narrowing of the arteries. 

Duplex ultrasound is a painless, noninvasive, no-risk test to evaluate blood flow through your arteries and veins . This test provides information to help your vascular surgeon make a sound diagnosis and outline a treatment plan. No radiation, dye or needles are used. Accuracy is critical, so ultrasound testing should ALWAYS be performed by a credentialed sonographer in an accredited vascular laboratory.

  • Do not eat or drink anything after midnight prior to your exam.  Take any morning medications with small sips of water. If you are diabetic, do not take your insulin or pills on the morning of the exam. Wear a two-piece outfit (no dresses). Wearing your clothes, you will be asked to lie on a stretcher.  

  • Ultrasound gel, usually warmed for your comfort, will be placed on your abdomen

  • Through the gel, the technician will apply to your abdomen a small hand-held device that emits sound waves. 

  • When the test is completed, the technician will remove excess gel from your abdomen. The gel is water-soluble and will not stain your skin or clothes.

 

Mesenteric Ultrasound

Many arteries and the veins can be studied by ultrasound, including the carotid, arm and leg arteries as well as the abdominal aorta. You may be given a renal ultrasound to produce images of your mesenteric arteries, the arteries that supply oxygenated blood to your digestive organs. This test helps to detect blockages or narrowing of the arteries in the abdominal area . The most common symptom of mesenteric artery disease is abdominal pain or cramping after eating a meal.

Duplex ultrasound is a painless, noninvasive, no-risk test to evaluate blood flow through your arteries and veins . This test provides information to help your vascular surgeon make a sound diagnosis and outline a treatment plan. No radiation, dye or needles are used. Accuracy is critical, so ultrasound testing should ALWAYS be performed by a credentialed sonographer in an accredited vascular laboratory.

  • Do not eat or drink anything after midnight prior to your exam.  Take any morning medications with small sips of water. If you are diabetic, do not take your insulin or pills on the morning of the exam. Wear a two-piece outfit (no dresses). Wearing your clothes, you will be asked to lie on a stretcher.  

  • Ultrasound gel, usually warmed for your comfort, will be placed on your abdomen

  • Through the gel, the technician will apply to your abdomen a small hand-held device that emits sound waves. 

  • When the test is completed, the technician will remove excess gel from your abdomen. The gel is water-soluble and will not stain your skin or clothes.

Thoracic Vascular Study

 

 

 

Venous Duplex (With or Without Reflux Analysis)

Many arteries and the veins can be studied by ultrasound, including the carotid, arm and leg arteries as well as the abdominal aorta. You may be given a renal ultrasound to produce images of the veins in your arms or legs. 

Venous return from the lower extremity to the heart must overcome gravitational forces in the upright position. In order to counter this gravitational force, biological adaptations such as muscle pump and venous valves and supportive fascial structure have evolved. However, over time, these can fail and lead to venous incompetence, a common problem affecting at least 25% of women and 15% of men (1). Venous reflux occurs when there is impaired return of blood from the veins in the legs and feet. This can cause symptoms such as swollen legs, varicose veins, skin breakdown, or ulcers.

Duplex ultrasound is a painless, noninvasive, no-risk test to evaluate blood flow through your arteries and veins . This test provides information to help your vascular surgeon make a sound diagnosis and outline a treatment plan. No radiation, dye or needles are used. Accuracy is critical, so ultrasound testing should ALWAYS be performed by a credentialed sonographer in an accredited vascular laboratory.

  • Take your normal medications on the day of your exam. Do not use oils, powders, or lotions on your legs on the day of your exam.

  • Ultrasound gel, usually warmed for your comfort, will be placed on your abdomen

  • Through the gel, the technician will apply to your abdomen a small hand-held device that emits sound waves. 

  • When the test is completed, the technician will remove excess gel from your abdomen. The gel is water-soluble and will not stain your skin.

 

Vein Mapping for Dialysis Access Creation

When someone has kidney failure, hemodialysis is a lifesaving treatment that filters their blood and removes harmful wastes. This allows them to survive a kidney condition and stay healthy.

A vascular access is a surgically-created vein that makes this treatment easier and more efficient. It allows a large amount of blood to flow continuously during hemodialysis, maximizing the volume of blood that can be filtered during a single session.

Your doctor will likely discuss a vascular access with you well before your first hemodialysis treatment. This is because a vascular access should already be in place for weeks or months before the first hemodialysis treatment occurs.

Before receiving a vascular access, you may have a Doppler ultrasound vessel mapping test.

Vein mapping is a technique performed with an ultrasound probe that uses sound waves (doppler) technology to view or “map” all of the veins under the skin on the arms or legs. It allows the doctor to see the size, depth, and flow of blood in these veins and allows for better treatment planning. No anesthesia is needed for this test and it can be performed by a vascular specialist in an outpatient setting.

 

Arteriovenous Fistula Duplex

1. Baliyan V, Tajmir S, Hedgire SS, Ganguli S, Prabhakar AM. Lower extremity venous reflux. Cardiovasc Diagn Ther. 2016;6(6):533-543. doi:10.21037/cdt.2016.11.14

 
abiheader.jpeg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Visit Society of Vascular Surgery For More Information.

Carotid artery ultrasound.jpg