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Minimally Invasive Treatment

At Omni Vascular and Diabetic Wound Care Center, Dr. Chaudry is proud to provide the most comprehensive vascular treatment options available in an ambulatory setting. These include not only angiogram, atherectomy, balloon angioplasty and stenting, but also:

  • IntraVascular UltraSound (IVUS)

  • Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy (PMT) using AngiojetTM and
    JetstreamTM Catheters

  • Drug-Coated Balloon Angioplasty (DCB)

  • Drug-Eluting Stent Technology (DES)

Together these technologies and services ensure the best possible outcomes for our patients.

Angiogram

An angiogram is an X-ray procedure that can be both diagnostic and therapeutic.  It is considered the gold standard for evaluating blockages in the arterial system. An angiogram detects blockages using X-rays taken during the injection of a contrast agent (iodine dye). The procedure provides information that helps your vascular surgeon determine your best treatment options. Angiograms are typically performed while you are sedated. The procedure may last 15-20 minutes or up to several hours, depending on how difficult the test is and how much treatment is given.

JetstreamTM Atherectomy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HawkOne Directional Atherectomy

The HawkOne™ directional atherectomy system is used to restore blood flow by removing plaque in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) present above or below the knee. The HawkOne device treats all plaque morphologies, including severe calcium. This state-of-the-art technology allows for enhanced crossing and simpler cleaning making the procedure more efficient. The apparatus is used to make a small channel or to maximize luminal gain to preserve a patient's native vessel and keep future treatment options open.

 

 

 

ROTABLATOR™ Rotational Atherectomy

 

Balloon Angioplasty

Balloon angioplasty is done in the catheterization laboratory (“cath lab”). The doctor injects a special dye through a small, thin tube called a catheter into your bloodstream. The dye allows the doctor to view your arteries on an X-ray monitor. A device with a small balloon on its tip is then inserted through an artery in your leg or arm and threaded through the arteries until it reaches the narrowed area. The balloon is inflated to flatten the plaque against the wall of the artery, opening the artery and restoring blood flow. Then the balloon is deflated and removed from your body.

Benefits:

  • The narrowing in the artery may be reduced, resulting in improved blood flow.

  • Major complications are uncommon.

  • You may be able to return to normal activities shortly after the procedure.

  • The procedure is usually performed using local anesthesia, which involves fewer risks than general anesthesia ("putting you under").

Drug-Coated Balloon Angioplasty (DCB)

Drug-Coated Balloon (DCB) angioplasty is similar to plain old balloon angioplasty procedurally, but there is the addition of an anti-proliferative medication coating the balloon, as well as an excipient to aid in drug transfer, which may help prevent restenosis. Restenosis is the re-narrowing of the vessel at a site that was previously treated. Using a drug-coated balloon has the potential to prohibit cell division, limiting the amount of restenosis, or blockage re-growth after treatment.

Angioplasty with a drug-coated balloon is done in a catheterization lab (“cath lab”). The doctor injects a special dye through a long, thin tube called a catheter into your bloodstream. The dye allows the doctor to view your arteries on an x-ray monitor. A device with a small balloon on its tip is then inserted through an artery in your leg and is advanced through the arteries until it reaches the narrowed area. The balloon is inflated which flattens the plaque against the wall of the artery, opening the artery and restoring blood flow. Then the balloon is deflated and removed from the body. Once that is complete, a new balloon, which is coated with an anti-proliferative medication, is inserted through the same artery in your leg and is advanced through the arteries until it reaches the previously treated narrowed area. The balloon is then inflated, and the medication on the balloon surface is delivered to the artery wall and surrounding tissue. After a designated period of time, your doctor will deflate the balloon and remove it from your body. They will then evaluate if any further treatment is necessary to maintain healthy blood flow through the area treated.

Benefits:

  • Superior safety and effectiveness as compared to conventional plain old balloon angioplasty.*

  • The narrowing in the artery may be reduced, resulting in improved blood flow.

  • Major complications are uncommon.

  • You may be able to return to normal activities shortly after the procedure.

  • The procedure is normally done under local anesthesia, which involves fewer risks than general anesthesia ("putting you under").

*IN.PACT SFA Trial, Data on file with Medtronic, Inc.

 

Stenting

Your doctor may recommend placing a stent to reopen your blocked artery. A stent is a small, expandable, mesh-like tube that supports the artery and helps to keep it open.

Implanting a stent does not require open surgery. The doctor inserts a catheter into an artery in your arm or leg, similar to the balloon angioplasty procedure. A specially designed catheter delivers the stent to the narrow area in the artery. The stent is expanded, flattening the plaque against the artery wall and holding the artery open with a mesh tube. The catheter used to deliver the stent is then removed, but the stent stays in your artery permanently to maintain healthy blood flow.

Benefits:

  • The stent scaffolds the artery open, improving blood flow.

  • You are awake for the procedure; general anesthesia is not needed.

  • The hospital stay is usually brief.

  • You may be able to return to normal activities quickly.

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Information provided by Medtronic